• Overview
  • Belvedere
  • Corte Madera
  • Fairfax
  • Larkspur
  • Mill Valley
  • Novato
  • Ross
  • San Anselmo
  • San Rafael
  • Sausalito
  • Tiburon
  • County of Marin
  • Contact
local road traffic

Local roads are important because they connect our neighborhoods and business districts and provide links to major roads and transportation services.

From 2004 through 2019 approximately $38 million was distributed directly to local jurisdictions in Marin County from the 2004 local Transportation Sales Tax, Measure A.

Total projected revenue from Measure AA, the 30-year renewal of the 1/2-cent Transportation Sales Tax passed by voters in 2018, is approximately $238 million (through 2049). The allocation of sales tax funds directly to local jurisdictions to “maintain and manage local roads” increased to 22% in the 2018 renewal Measure AA (up from 13.25% allocated in the 2004 Measure).

In addition, every three years, approximately $2.5 million is distributed directly to local jurisdictions from the Vehicle Registration Fee, Measure B.

How funding is allocated

Each jurisdiction has unique needs and priorities that are best identified at the local level. Because of this, local roads funds from both Measures AA and B are allocated to local agencies to use at their discretion.

Funding is based on a formula weighted 50% by the population of the local agency’s jurisdiction and 50% by the number of lane miles within the limits of that agency’s jurisdiction.

Agency %
Belvedere 0.99%
Corte Madera 3.39%
Fairfax 2.82%
Larkspur 3.93%
Mill Valley 5.65%
Novato 18.08%
Ross 1.03%
San Anselmo 4.41%
San Rafael 19.55%
Sausalito 2.72%
Tiburon 3.43%
County 34.01%
Total 100.00%

Belvedere is less than 1 square mile in size, with a population of just over 2,000 people. Local roads funding is used for projects that improve pedestrian and driver safety in the largely residential community.

Funding

Under Measure A, Belvedere received $379,614 in funding between 2004 and 2019.

Under Measure AA, Belvedere is projected to receive approximately $50,000 each year to maintain and manage local roads. The total projected amount is approximately $2.35 million over the lifetime of the Measure.

These projections are based on estimated sales tax revenue.

The Town of Corte Madera encompasses 4.406 square miles, of which 1.242 square miles is water, and is home to more than 9,900 residents. Local roads funding helps to improve the safety and drivability of the town’s roadways.

Funding

Under Measure A, Corte Madera received $1,305,058 in funding between 2004 and 2019.

Under Measure AA, Corte Madera is projected to receive approximately $175,000 each year to maintain and manage local roads. The total projected amount is approximately $8.44 million over the lifetime of the Measure.

These projections are based on estimated sales tax revenue.

Spanning the the hills and valleys of the Upper Ross Valley, Fairfax is approximately 2 square miles and has approximately 7,500 residents. Local roads funding is used to keep the town’s often winding roadways in good repair.

Funding

Under Measure A, Fairfax received $1,064,316 in funding between 2004 and 2019.

Under Measure AA, Fairfax is projected to receive approximately $200,000 each year to maintain and manage local roads. The total projected amount is approximately $6.61 million over the lifetime of the Measure.

These projections are based on estimated sales tax revenue.

Approximately 12,000 residents live in the City of Larkspur, which covers an area of about 3 square miles. Larkspur is the location of one of Golden Gate Ferry’s main terminals, which provides transportation from Marin County to the San Francisco Ferry Building. Local roads funding is used to keep the roads and sidewalks safe for residents and the many commuters that depend on the ferry terminal.

Funding
Larkspur receives approximately $120,000 each year in Measure A funding. The city is projected to receive more than $2.4 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • Safe Routes to School – Doherty Drive

Nestled at the foot of Mount Tamalpais, approximately 14,000 people live in the 4.8 square mile area of Mill Valley. Local roads funding improves the safety and functionality of the city’s streets and sewer system.

Funding
Mill Valley receives approximately $180,000 each year in Measure A funding. The city is projected to receive more than $3.4 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • 2016 Street and Sewer Rehabilitation Project – CIP

Novato is one of the largest cities by area in Marin County, covering 28 square miles. Though it is home to nearly 53,000 people, it has a rural feel, with half the density of San Rafael. Local roads funding is used to keep streets in good repair.

Funding
Novato receives approximately $500,000 each year in Measure A funding. The town is projected to receive nearly $11 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • Measure A Group 9 Pavement Rehabilitation on 24 street segments

The Town of Ross is 1.6 square miles and has about 2,500 residents. Rural and “small town” in character, Ross uses local roads funding to improve the condition and safety of its streets.

Funding
Ross receives approximately $33,000 each year in Measure A funding. The town is projected to receive nearly $635,000 through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • 2016 Roadway Improvements on more than eight road segments, including Brookwood Lane, Redwood Drive (Brookwood to Town Limit), Lagunitas Road (various locations), Sir Francis Drake Blvd (various locations), Fallen Leaf, Wellington Avenue (various locations), Walnut Avenue, Olive Avenue and others

The Town of San Anselmo is located in the center of Ross Valley, surrounded by hills and intersected by waterways. The 2.6-square-mile area has a small town feel, with a population of about 12,000 residents. San Anselmo uses local roads funding to repair its streets.

Funding
San Anselmo receives approximately $140,000 each year in Measure A funding. The town is projected to receive more than $2.7 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • 2016 Pavement Rehabilitation and Preservation Project Repaving Bank St., Arroyo Ave. and slurry sealing Sir Francis Drake from Tamalpais to Center and From Sunny Hills Dr. to Saunders Ave.

The second-largest city in Marin County by area, the City of San Rafael is also the county seat of Marin County. Its 22 square miles include 17 square miles of land and 5 square miles of water and tidelands are home to more than 57,500 people. The city uses local roads funding to keep streets and other infrastructure like pedestrian bridges repaired.

Funding
San Rafael receives approximately $600,000 each year in Measure A funding. The town is projected to receive nearly $12 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • Street Resurfacing 16/17 of 25 road segments
  • Grand Avenue Pedestrian Bridge

Perched on tidal flats and hills overlooking the Bay, Sausalito is 2.2 square miles, of which .4 square miles is water. Approximately 7,000 residents live in the city, which can be accessed from San Francisco by ferry. Sausalito uses local roads funds to maintain and repair streets and sidewalks for residents as well as the many tourists that visit year-round.

Funding
Sausalito receives approximately $80,000 each year in Measure A funding. The town is projected to receive more than $1.6 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • City of Sausalito FY 16/17 Streets Project

Tiburon is approximately 13 square miles and is located on a peninsula that extends into the Bay. The town is primarily residential, with a population of more than 9,000, and is accessible via ferry. Local roads funding is used to keep streets and sidewalks in good repair for residents and tourists.

Funding
Tiburon receives approximately $100,000 each year in Measure A funding. The town is projected to receive more than $2 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • 2018 various streets overlay

Marin County’s Department of Public Works is responsible for improving and maintaining the public infrastructure throughout the County. Local roadway funding is used for roadway repair.

Funding
The County of Marin receives approximately $1 million each year in Measure A funding. The County is projected to receive more than $20 million through FY 2024/25.

Current local roads projects

  • 2017 Road Rehabilitation Project – Southern Region
  • 2017 Road Rehabilitation Project – Western Region